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20121222
20121230
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CSPAN2 29
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English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:00am EST
come within the exclusive heather brown bread he insisted on buying them. he said they tasted better, which was to my mind nonsense. proper bread was white and please placed in tasted like almost nothing. [laughter] that was the point. the driver of the police car got out, open the door and told me to get in. my father rode up front with the driver. the police covered slowly down the lane. bolinas unpaved back then, just wide enough for one car at a time from a, precipitous bumpy with the whole thing prodded by farm equipment and rain and time. these kids think it's funny to steal a car, drive a car and hit the internet. >> i'm just glad it was fun so fast that my father. pastorius mall grow with with hair so ponder this almost white and red, red cheeks stared at us as we went past. i hope my piece of toast on my lap. funny than leaving it down here said the policemen because it's a long walk back to anywhere from here. we passed a bend in the lane and saw the way to many over the side in front of the gate leading into a field, tires sunk deep in the brown eyed. we showed passed it,
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:00pm EST
to the left not holding the bible. the bible was, instead, held by james r. browning, a clerk of the supreme court. a few more pictures to show you. or reagan's swearing-in, jimmy carter, bill clinton and. here's 1985. this is reagan's second inauguration. a different locale, and the reason is because the weather was so bad in washington d.c. in 1985, it was a wind chill factor below zero, and so everything got canceled. the parade get canceled. then moved the of taking indoors and to the capitol rotunda, so there were only about 1,000 people squeezed in. weather has been a problem a few times, as i mentioned. an old picture from 89 in a lot of rain for the inauguration of benjamin harrison. 1945 this was franklin d. roosevelt's fourth inauguration. the war was going on. he was ill. everything was moved to the white house and he took the of have one of the balcony is there at the white house. so you know that fdr had for inauguration's. here's my trivia. you can impress your friends. barack obama is about to tiny franklin d. roosevelt record. how could that be? roosevelt was inaugurated four
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 7:00am EST
word. i got the book and read the opening sentence in the store. jackie brown, at 26, with no expression on his face, said that he could get some guns. i finished the book at home in one sitting, it was like 180 pages, and felt like i had been set free. he moved to story almost entirely with dialogue. the conversations of cops and criminals. their voices establishing the style of his writing. i stopped trying to care what was going on in my books, and begin to show, begin to show what from the points of view and the voices of the characters. bad guys and good ones, the way george higgins used his ear to tell what his people were up to. five years after the call came up, a "new york times" review of one of my books said that often cannot resist a set piece, and lowbrow or a, with a crazy kind of scatological poetry. with the manner of george v. higgins. that's pretty much how i learned to write in a style, i lifted from higgins, but changed enough until it became my own stuff. i want to thank the national book foundation for my award, and recognizing executive director
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 6:00pm EST
, babies of all races, white, black, brown, yellow, red. or if he stood quietly in the chaos and took it all in. he knew he'd come home. the good earth commune with essential part of the second wave of haight-ashbury settlement. the commune was founded in 1968 by keever and fellow ex-convict named cyril isaacs who we met in prison where keever served four and a half years. the idea cable he was on parole and working on the rapid transit title that was being constructed under the bay. he and his ex-con friends with both the resources and live communally in the haight. it was a small group of friends of the women who love them. but good earth rapidly grew until it was a sprawling network of more than a half-dozen houses and in this ever-changing changing membership is estimated to over 700 people. the batteries took up with the diggers have left off. in many ways they were tougher and more resilient. the core group within the commune were hardened young men and women, vietnam veteran, streetwise runaways who knew how to survive. they called themselves a church and claimed pot as their s
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 2:00pm EST
was a democrat. he had been a big contributor to edmund brown, helping brown to defeat nixon to become governor of california in 1962. nixon still remembered that. one of the early dirty tricks of the nixon white house was finding a way to get rid of ray. nixon's housing secretary was george romney whose son has been in the news lately. mitt romney's dad complained ray was not being cooperative. he felt he could run fannie mae any way he saw fit. there was also talk that ray might have used fannie mae posted your letter head to raise money for democratic candidates and the white house was getting complaints from republican lawyers in south carolina that democratic lawyers were getting all the fannie mae work related to foreclosures, all the fees. in nine months of taking office nixon hired him -- fired him without giving any public explanation. lapin resisted, said that nixon was turning fannie mae and to what he called a patronage putting. lapin tried to get a restraining order from a federal judge. the judge wouldn't budge. beret kept showing up for work anyway. at one point of the lights wen
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2012 7:00pm EST
objection. mr. reid: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that the vitter-brown of ohio amendment, which is at the desk, be agreed to, and the bill add amende as e read a third time and passed, motions to reconsider be laid on the table, that all statements related to the bill be placed in the record at the appropriate place as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the foreign relations committee be discharged from further consideration of s. res. 613 and we proceed to that matter now. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: s. res. 613, urging the governments of europe and the european union to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and so forth. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. reid: the ask the senate proceed to a voice vote on the adochghts resolution. -- on the adoption of the resolution. the presiding officer: is there further debate? if not, all in favor say aye. those opposed say no. the ayes appear to have it. the ayes have it. the resolution is
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 10:00pm EST
two nights before it would most likely be packed and negative brown bag for a traveling businessman. past the white church spires they would fall toward the west and the temperature began to drop. the towns of western massachusetts were known for the long winter in this was not an exception. there was still snow on the ground in patches. and was miles from any weather. the tracks were clear and was wrapped of a winding down the most rewarding business trip he ever had. he was hailed as a pioneer in the field he was so successful he was highlighted in the papers and the industry considered to be the most exciting in america. the store was filled with activity just hiring a new sales and named fred warner. and getting ready to expand it again. especially ribbons that were the rage. he already had the requisite to and hands and even hired a local architect to design a few within eight tenements to house the employees he planned on hiring. but something else was on his mind. friday, that may 15, 1874. the 18th wedding anniversary and hid in and protected there was of build the line to b
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:15am EST
jack kennedy is off to the left in the picture and the bible was instead held by james browning who was a clerk of the supreme court. a few more pictures to show you. here's ronald reagan swearing in in 1981 jimmy carter out of president to the right of the picture and bill clinton in 1993 years 1985 this is the second inauguration and notice it is a different locale yet the reason is because the weather was so bad in washington, d.c. in 1985 there is a factor if everything got canceled, the parade canceled, they moved the oath taking in doors into the capitol rotunda so there are about a thousand people and the letter has been a problem as i mentioned in 1989 a lot of rain that today for the inauguration of benjamin harrison and then in 1945 this was franklin d. roosevelt's fourth inauguration. he wasn't feeling well come he was ill and everything was moved to the white house. he took the oath at one of the balcony is there at the white house. so you know that fdr had for inauguration's. here is my trivia for the day you will be able to impress your friends. barack obama is about t
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:00am EST
brown shock with sideburns. his body was smooth and his chest was hairless. without definition, though he could attack him and easily. mark twain's mustache and goatee were unimpressive. he wore a coat of smoke and soot, which is the three men played poker, to meet their bare feet, there was a secret tunnel. under that, a huge raft upon which the massive granite building floated. two doors down and a half a block away later murders corner. in early may, he took a two-month visit to john briggs and eight former classmate in hannibal. and literally took hours. a thorough fare he likened to just like being on main street in hannibal and meaningful familiar faces. the montgomery block block dominated montgomery and washington streets. number 722 and 724 montgomery. it had been a gold rush tobacco warehouse and now the man, mark twain, setting his cars. it was cold and sweaty in his palm. he took a swig. a few droplets caught in his horseshoe mustache, and he left them there. he spoke and he had become addicted on the mississippi. he contributed his own cloud and by the barrel for $4, he he
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 10:00am EST
randolph, silverman, and brown where they have essentially said, thanks a lot of a supreme court, for dumping this burden on us. you said that liberty and security, it's easy to balance these things. now, go forth to do it. we will give you any of the underlying standards. we are sure you can work it out as you go along. you can see why they are little bit upset about that. one of the biggest surprises to me actually of this presence of restoration is how closely the obama of lustration is skewed to the bush of the illustrations cover terrorism policies. i think a lot of that dynamic is what goes on, you come in and assume an office and seven realized that the responsibility of keeping the american people live and say it is now on your shoulders. and it's very easy when you're sitting back to armchair quarterback the decisions of a previous set restoration here and there, but when you're sitting in the chair and realizing you are responsible and that is what these judges are essentially saying. thank you for making as is possible for having to go in and in detail figure out and e
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:30pm EST
it is work by robert putnam at harvard or princeton or pew and galloped and brown and all the social science research and ask the question of effectiveness. what does this teach us? and what you come up with is a very simple model called the interfaith triangle. we know based on the social science research that if you know one person of a different religious background. if you have a single meaningful relationship with the mormon or in evangelical or a muslim or a jew, your attitude toward that whole community improves. in fact, we also know from the social science data that your attitude toward other religious communities improves. we also know that if you have what we call appreciative knowledge of a different religion, something as simple as being about the place of the profit mohammad within islam that your attitude towards that improves. those three things, attitude, knowledge, relationships, deeply connected. what is an effective interface program? by the way, this might sound simple and common sense and i'm very happy to say that part of a we do for a living is derivation of data that
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:00am EST
in the store. jackie browne at 26 with no expression on his face said he could get some guns. i finished the book at home and one sitting and felt like i had been set free. hying begins moved the story almost entirely with dialogue to conversations of cops and criminals. their voices establishing the style and driving. i stopped trying to tell what was going on in my books and began to show. i began to show it from the pointing of view and voices of characters bad guys and good ones. the way george used his ear to tell what his people were up to. five years later "the new york times" said i often cannot resist a set piece. with a crazy is kind of scat logical poetry. that's pretty much how i learned to write in a style. i lifted from higgins but changed enough until it became my own sound. i want to thank the national book foundation for my award and recognize the executive director harrold. and his people for keeping this event on track despite sandy trying to stop us. they deserve our thanks and praise. i have to tell you -- [applause] -- i have to tell you i'm energized by the honor.
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 3:15pm EST
start writing your first novel is a new experience you get the names and say you have brown eyes and then you get to page 50 or 100 probably nobody's ever going to read this. when i got to that stage, i thought the heck with that. i'll finish the thing. they have that streak of obstinate sea this is now going going to finish it. >> in the news business were discouraged from making things better. and of course you have to make everything out. [laughter] >> almost everything. ever since i is benito, the first book i researched. i was born in 1949 so i have no memories and so i had to find out what everyday life is like during the war for people in the u.k., which is for the story of a set. so i researched it and never sent then i realized that that works for me to write a novel, but with a factual background that is very much imparted in the story and it helps me to get the book a kind of texture. it's not everybody's way, but interweaving the fictional story of their side effects have been the way this worked for me. >> if you're going to use research for book is one thing if it t
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 7:00pm EST
thing -- scott brown, i'm afraid. [laughter] the great story there, the last one to do this, and he did it successfully with pat moynihan in new york. he ran against william buckley's brother jim. at the first debate, buckley turned to him and starts bashing comes right out of the court with moynihan. he looks up and says, oh, the mudslinging begins. [laughter] >> thank you. tell us and generalize for us, historians have not typically have access to anything resembling this kind of material with the exception of nixon and whatever. how were we to regard the source of information? what is it? you have to check it? is a good way to his? >> i think it is good to go. what is wonderful about these tapes is the immediacy of them. also, we do have other presidential tapes to listen to. one of the things that i actually love about these tapes of the conversations between president kennedy and his brother. when you listen to the nixon tapes, they have a certain quality. then you listen to the two kennedy brothers talking about how mean this guy is. it sounds so quaint as opposed to some of what
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 8:00am EST
with this very charming man whose eyes were alternately described as brown, blue and gray. people couldn't even describe how his eyes were. he was charming and gracious and funny and witty and totally beguiling. and her husband, who was the head of the national intelligence, comes in and says, oh, mr. jefferson, i'm sorry i'm late. and margaret bayard smith's head explodes because she just found him to be the most gracious man she'd ever metment -- met. he could disarm you that way. there is something poetic in the fact that william jefferson clinton is william jefferson clinton. [laughter] by the way, president clinton is still campaigning somewhere. [laughter] i don't know how anyone's going to tell him we voted. maybe he's already starting on the next one. i want to talk a little bit, we -- jefferson, the politician, jefferson, the renaissance man, jeff the symbol -- jefferson, the symbol, you know, secessionists wanted a piece of him in the run-up to the civil war, frank lib roosevelt -- franklin roosevelt wanted him in the runup to world war ii. he can be used in any way you need partly be
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 3:00pm EST
would most likely be packed in a box or brown bag, just a few per funk ri rituals for a traveling businessman. as the train sped along past the white church spires of various new england greens, the afternoon sun began falling toward the west, and the temperature began dropping as well. the hill towns of western massachusetts, of which skinnerville was one, were known for their long winters. in the year 1874, it had been no exception. it had snowed for days at the end of april with heavy storms paralyzing the countryside. and can there was still snow on the ground in patches. but for the moment in that sun-streaked car, skinner was miles from any lingering wintrywet. outside the sky was clear, the tracks were clear x he was rapidly winding down one of the most rewarding business trips he'd ever had. skinner had just been hailed as a pioneer in his field. his speech was highlighted in the papers, and his industry was considered to be one of the most exciting in american. furthermore, his store downtown was filled with activity. he'd just hired a new salesman, a strapping young man
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 7:45pm EST
barnett, frederick douglass and it had a bit effect on a man named john brown who wanted to strike the first blow at harpers ferry. so i guess this is a final thought i would leave you with. one of the most remarkable things about movements from below is that they are unpredictable. you never know when they are going to arise or how. these things that rise up and demands for justice, these demands for equality, these demands for freedom. they are unpredictable and in their unpredictability i think they are also a great source of hope. thank you very much. [applause] we have time for questions and i hope you will have some. we would like you to speak into the microphone if possible. >> during the discussion you talk about roaming around. how did they believe that slaves are brought onto the ship and were shackled and stayed shackled. did they get free somehow? >> is a good question. the standard practice on slave ships was for the men to be shackled but not the women or children. a must the women resisted in which case they would be shackled by the men. but they were not usually sha
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00am EST
in kansas, and vice versa. so they wanted to supply arms to the abolitionist. >> host: john brown. >> guest: so they could defend themselves against attacks by their opponents. after the war, the klu klux klan and groups like that were persecuting freedman, free blacks in the south, and the blacks began to look for ways to defend themselves. the federal government tried continue constitute new state mill lit ya in some of the southern states, and blacks saw them as a way of -- >> host: certainly guns played a role in a lot of our hoyt. what was the legal understanding in those times? when there were restrictions, did folks consider that unconstitutional or just a political battle, whether it is an urban area or a city on the from tier trying -- frontier trying to get its act together. >> guest: the courts didn't have much to say about gun rights except in the state courts, where for the most part, early rulings by state and lower federal courts, supported the right and saw it as a -- not a right that belonged to criminals or to be used for criminal purposes, but more as a right that was in
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
the supreme court decision in the brown v. board of education decision 1954. strom thurmond is a recordholder to this day of the longest one man filibuster. and again his work pashtun and the guinness book of world records, 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today as one of the last of the jim crow demagogues. and he was. he was that. he was one of the last jim crow demagogue. what we forget about thurmond is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what do i mean by that? what's a sun belt conservative? the sun belt, it's one of the big stories, one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. and that is the flow of jobs, of industry, of resources and population from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest in the post-world war ii period. the southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united stat
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:30pm EST
were brown and withered and swept by fire. here and very mysterious white power clung to rooftops and lay in the gutters of houses and towns, did the traces of something that had fallen like snow from the skies weeks before. everywhere there was an ominous quiet, a silence that closed the town and surrounding the living world as if the area had become entombed, quote, there was a strange stillness, the birds for example. where had they gone?ññññÑí many people spoke of them, puzzled and disturbed. the feeding stations in backyards were deserted. a few birds seen anywhere were moribund. they trembled violently and could not fly. it was a spring without voices. on the mornings at once dropped with the dawn chorus of robins, catbirds, and doves, rans and let the bird voices there was now no sound, only silence way over the fields and woods of the march. in the space of ten paragraphs the new yorker combine them into three, carson had written the story of the end of the world. what reader in 1962 could fail to see in this description all bleak possibilities of the modern ag
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 9:00am EST
brown v board said after segregationist contrary to the constitution then you have a case that it arises out of little rock. little rock begins when a judge says we mean that. by the way the first year after brown what happened? the second year nothing. the third year they finally get around to doing something and the judge says put those children in the schools and so what happens? some of us can remember the governor of arkansas called on his militia to get them into the school and to keep them out. and the congressman down there who was a moderate arrange a meeting with eisenhower whose president and president eisenhower and its roof of a governor come he goes into the room, and he says let them do it, let them do it, i will integrate the school and he goes out of the room and tells the press the opposite. and he says the president dressed me down like a sergeant, like a general tour system assurgent. that's what happens. then eisenhower's is what do i have to do coming and he says to jimmy byrnes the governor from south carolina what do i do, and burns was a moderate democrat that re
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 2:00am EST
browne. the member of parliament. it's great to have you here. thank you for coming. to oppose the motion, i call from the east of england. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. we are here for one reason. to make contain and empower the young people that we so proudly represent. but, -- the parliament campaign for the next year to be made public transport better, and acceptable for both. we are not giving the young people that we have -- [inaudible] the justice they deserve. [inaudible] have been the campaign for the last year. we have not achieved the goal of making transport cheaper, better, and exceptional. so this year, let's pay that is more assessable to be reached. which one question impact instead of continually -- [inaudible] our campaign year after year. we are here to make contain -- [inaudible] campaign that is not reachable. in apartmentment we are protect our youth services and civilities. we continue to see -- [inaudible] local governments and local consulates to keep these facilities. so with reable to be here today at the house of parliament. by asking the cheaper transp
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 7:30am EST
press, an imprint of harpercollins. kevin powers, the yellow bird. published by little brown. [applause] the 2012 national book award for fiction dose -- goes to "the round house", by louise erdrich. [applause] ♪ ♪ hey, baby, where are you is? [laughter] [applause] [laughter] >> wow. hello, my relatives. [speaking in native tongue] national book foundation and also the judges, and a shout out for all of the native people who are watching this live stream. [applause] i want to thank harpercollins. it's not each a huge company anymore -- can it's not even a huge company anymore. [laughter] but it's always been about four or five people to me. people who believed so strongly in my work that they've supported me and my family and literature. my bookstore and all of us who work there through these years. i want to thank my editor, terry cardin, for believing in the book. [applause] jonathan burnham, jane byrne, jim duffy, i want to thank andrew wily and jim ott. [applause] i want to say to my fellow writers, you've written extraordinary books. i don't really know why i'm standing here, b
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:00pm EST
prosecutions. i did the same thing in ohio with senator brown in cleveland. same witnesses, ohio election officials and questions -- same questions, same answers. it's come down to this. elections in america are supposed to be a contest between candidates with voters making the ultimate judgment. instead into many state elections become a contest between voters and special interest groups like alec, which are hell-bent on limiting the right of americans to vote. look what happened during this last election. things that i think need to be changed are embarrassing to us. how can we be satisfied with our fellow citizens stand in line for seven hours to vote until 2:30 a.m.? doesn't make sense for state legislatures to reduce early voting opportunities? and the flexibility many working americans need to exercise their right to vote. how can we watch laws being passed in legislatures requiring identification which the legislators know full well that hundreds of thousands of people will never be able to obtain in time to vote? should we be to appointed by the increasing number of increasing num
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2012 8:00pm EST
joined by the former government chief when the labour party was in office nick browne. the member of parliament. it's great to have you here. thank you for coming. to oppose the motion, i call from the east of england. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. we are here for one reason. to make contain and empower the young people that we so proudly represent. but, -- the parliament campaign for the next year to be made public transport better, and acceptable for both. we are not giving the young people that we have -- [inaudible] the justice they deserve. [inaudible] have been the campaign for the last year. we have not achieved the goal of making transport cheaper, better, and exceptional. so this year, let's pay that is more assessable to be reached. which one question impact instead of continually -- [inaudible] our campaign year after year. we are here to make contain -- [inaudible] campaign that is not reachable. in apartmentment we are protect our youth services and civilities. we continue to see -- [inaudible] local governments and local consulates to keep these facilities. s
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2012 11:00pm EST
the proposition, i call natasha brown. >> thank you, mr. speaker. a curriculum for life is not the motion this year. there are many life lessons to benefit from. for different generations. sense of social duty, raise a family and manage our debt. the question is who should teach them? and our answer? not teachers. the responsibility and privilege of providing the facts of life rests within our family, parents and communities. to help insurgent tour -- insurgent tour -- nurture us. we learn about life by living it. not the teacher questioning us and talking about hypothetical situations in textbooks. i think this motion raises the assumes that a curriculum for life can be designed for somebody in westminster. i think it is the state outreaching its mandate. the motion is potentially danger and is not there to parent a child. [inaudible] wouldn't have a clue what i was talking about. the world is changing, and running this now would become outdated before it begins. a curriculum for life is a good idea in theory. but the association idea and central knowledge is extremely questionable. we
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 8:00pm EST
handsome. maybe that's not the best description. strikingly handsome with piercing brown eyes and an aqua line knows, olive skin and an irrepressible sense of confidence. .. the most significant manufacturing industry in the 20th century history. i'm semi-taking liberty douglas got things pulitzer prize. superman has this helpful history around the time adult issues. it's an iconic place for the civil rights struggle and the children's crusade in 1963. but what is he able to do in birmingham in a way that challenges what we think about this. >> he did not want to be a farmer. he did not want to be a sharecropper. this is a place that early on was that segregated. we think about her manhattan is misrepresented -- but the office, when he first appears in the census as a homeowner has white neighbors end up with that, not the time. it was a place where someone who wanted to make his mark at at the field could do that. >> so he buys property? >> he buys property. >> another property owner. >> between you and me again -- >> s.,
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 11:00pm EST
. piercing brown eyes. olive skin and irrepressible sense of confidence. most were sharecroppers, a former slaves and scramble then the red clay fields the promise had withered like the spring grass seared by the summer sun. even his father who gave him that lighter skin never giving him legitimacy. t2 was born a slave and the man who's a identity he may have never known. he moves to birmingham alabama. but ultimately to provide the raw materials for the automobile industry, the manufacturing industry, and i take the liberty with the pulitzer prize-winning book but there's an awful history that is an iconic place for the civil rights struggle. what can dolphus do in birmingham? >> guest: he did not want to be a farmer or sharecropper. this was not segregated. reef being given as representatives but. >> it was not uncommon but someone who wanted to make his mark could do that. he buys property. >> host: so he is an amazing character. and is the most distant relative with this story but also people know him and how you could write about the life of melvenia. >> guest: a woman who was born in
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)